Showing posts tagged Waveforms.
x

Listening/Technology/Journal

About   Tag Cloud   Articles, Columns, Essays   

Links etc. collected by Rob Walker.

twitter.com/notrobwalker:

    
Ssaliva’s release for Vlek, executed by Dimitri Runkkari (part of Brussels’ design studio Stoëmp), the samples of a digital waveform are rendered in letterpress, as paper tradition meets the 21st-century audio file. It’s the perfect illustration of an unseen, virtual music being made material. (See Stoëmp’s portfolio pages on Ssaliva and RZA, for Vlek.)
That’s just one of a number of physical releases from Vlek, surveyed in the images here. But this is the same label that is championing downloads, via Bandcamp. In fact, right now, you can download their complete 2010/2012 catalog for free. (Ironically, you instead pay for singles – the assumption is to exchange free for a whole-hog embrace of the label’s musical output.
And our timing is right: today is the release of VLEK12, from increasingly-acclaimed Squeaky Lobster, on 12″ and digital. (Details on that release below.)
We asked Vlek’s Julien Fournier to explain how a free catalog mixes with physical sales, and how this label preserves the value of its musical identity.

 (via How Music Label Vlek Makes Ephemeral Sound Physical, While Giving Away Their Catalog [Gallery, Interview])

    Ssaliva’s release for Vlek, executed by Dimitri Runkkari (part of Brussels’ design studio Stoëmp), the samples of a digital waveform are rendered in letterpress, as paper tradition meets the 21st-century audio file. It’s the perfect illustration of an unseen, virtual music being made material. (See Stoëmp’s portfolio pages on Ssaliva and RZA, for Vlek.)

    That’s just one of a number of physical releases from Vlek, surveyed in the images here. But this is the same label that is championing downloads, via Bandcamp. In fact, right now, you can download their complete 2010/2012 catalog for free. (Ironically, you instead pay for singles – the assumption is to exchange free for a whole-hog embrace of the label’s musical output.

    And our timing is right: today is the release of VLEK12, from increasingly-acclaimed Squeaky Lobster, on 12″ and digital. (Details on that release below.)

    We asked Vlek’s Julien Fournier to explain how a free catalog mixes with physical sales, and how this label preserves the value of its musical identity.

     (via How Music Label Vlek Makes Ephemeral Sound Physical, While Giving Away Their Catalog [Gallery, Interview])

    — 1 year ago with 1 note
    #waveforms  #music objects  #merch 
    
The obsession with creating physical manifestations of the lovable waveform seems to be growing every day, whether folks are visualizing the sound of dubstep with vinyl or making the process mass-production-friendly 3D renditions made of paper. Artist Juan Manuel de J. Escalante, who goes by Realität joins the ranks of the waveform visualizers with a different take on the concept: creating 3D landscapes by arranging the wave in a spiral for his series Microsonic Sculptures.
The end product is a donut of sonic action, 3D printed using a MakerBot, and using the varying volume of the song to create a circular terrain unique to each song. For this project, Escalante chose five songs with varying sonic textures to show the range of possibilities achievable with this method.

(via Realität 3D Prints Spiral Waveforms Of Songs By Portishead, Nick Drake, And Others | The Creators Project)

    The obsession with creating physical manifestations of the lovable waveform seems to be growing every day, whether folks are visualizing the sound of dubstep with vinyl or making the process mass-production-friendly 3D renditions made of paper. Artist Juan Manuel de J. Escalante, who goes by Realität joins the ranks of the waveform visualizers with a different take on the concept: creating 3D landscapes by arranging the wave in a spiral for his series Microsonic Sculptures.

    The end product is a donut of sonic action, 3D printed using a MakerBot, and using the varying volume of the song to create a circular terrain unique to each song. For this project, Escalante chose five songs with varying sonic textures to show the range of possibilities achievable with this method.

    (via Realität 3D Prints Spiral Waveforms Of Songs By Portishead, Nick Drake, And Others | The Creators Project)

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes
    #Waveforms 
    
Paris-based Brazilian artists Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain's animation Wave Horizon (One and Two mediums)  is composed of a piece of printed sheet music and two black and white projections. The piece combines geometric tracks of sine waves, which have a similar shape to sea, sound, and light waves.
Eight tracks of graphic and sonic elements glide in the field of the image, creating a moving horizon for the installation. Each track is composed of three elements corresponding to each wave’s behavior. Tracks that appear closer to viewers move faster and have a higher pitch while ones that look farther away move more slowly and have a lower pitch. The combination of these elements builds a geometric landscape of sound waves. The projection is followed by a map that describes the structure of the composition as a palindrome, that is, it can be read right to left or left to right.

(via Typographical Experiments And Sound Waves Become Geometric Landscapes | The Creators Project)

    Paris-based Brazilian artists Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain's animation Wave Horizon (One and Two mediums)  is composed of a piece of printed sheet music and two black and white projections. The piece combines geometric tracks of sine waves, which have a similar shape to sea, sound, and light waves.

    Eight tracks of graphic and sonic elements glide in the field of the image, creating a moving horizon for the installation. Each track is composed of three elements corresponding to each wave’s behavior. Tracks that appear closer to viewers move faster and have a higher pitch while ones that look farther away move more slowly and have a lower pitch. The combination of these elements builds a geometric landscape of sound waves. The projection is followed by a map that describes the structure of the composition as a palindrome, that is, it can be read right to left or left to right.

    (via Typographical Experiments And Sound Waves Become Geometric Landscapes | The Creators Project)

    — 1 year ago with 1 note
    #Waveforms  #Visuals 
    murketing:


Epic Frequency clarifies this by turning sound visualizations into prints suitable for framing.
Epic’s site creates oversized waveform images of famous speeches and quotes from the likes of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Albert Einstein, Ronald Reagan, and of course, President Obama and Mitt Romney. The stylish data visualizations are 1.5 feet tall by 4 feet wide, ensuring even the smallest inflections and changes in cadence are depicted.

 (via Epic Frequency Turns Audio Files Into Wall Art | Wired Design | Wired.com)


Previously: Stealth Iconography: The Waveform

    murketing:

    Epic Frequency clarifies this by turning sound visualizations into prints suitable for framing.

    Epic’s site creates oversized waveform images of famous speeches and quotes from the likes of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Albert Einstein, Ronald Reagan, and of course, President Obama and Mitt Romney. The stylish data visualizations are 1.5 feet tall by 4 feet wide, ensuring even the smallest inflections and changes in cadence are depicted.

     (via Epic Frequency Turns Audio Files Into Wall Art | Wired Design | Wired.com)

    Previously: Stealth Iconography: The Waveform

    — 1 year ago with 8 notes
    #Waveforms 
    sisterspock:

Microsonic Landscapes: What Music Looks Like in 3D
What would your favorite album look like in three dimensions? Mexico City-based research and experimentation studio Realität proposes “a new spatial and unique journey” by transforming the sounds of five albums into physical matter. ‘Microsonic Landscapes’ translate sound waves into 3D-printed visualizations that resemble circular cityscapes, mountain ranges or volcanic craters.

    sisterspock:

    Microsonic Landscapes: What Music Looks Like in 3D

    What would your favorite album look like in three dimensions? Mexico City-based research and experimentation studio Realität proposes “a new spatial and unique journey” by transforming the sounds of five albums into physical matter. ‘Microsonic Landscapes’ translate sound waves into 3D-printed visualizations that resemble circular cityscapes, mountain ranges or volcanic craters.

    (Source: sunfoundation, via saveloadrestore)

    — 1 year ago with 319 notes
    #Waveforms 
    
Waves is perhaps the work that best sums up the concept of the exhibition Visualizing Sound. A long stretch of rope is hold tightly between two poles. Left to its own devices, the rope remains immobile and soundless. But as soon as visitors approaches, the rope starts spinning, hissing and adopting sinusoid and times, almost menacing volumes.

(via Visualizing Sound - Representations of Sound in Contemporary Creation - we make money not art)

    Waves is perhaps the work that best sums up the concept of the exhibition Visualizing Sound. A long stretch of rope is hold tightly between two poles. Left to its own devices, the rope remains immobile and soundless. But as soon as visitors approaches, the rope starts spinning, hissing and adopting sinusoid and times, almost menacing volumes.

    (via Visualizing Sound - Representations of Sound in Contemporary Creation - we make money not art)

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #Waveforms  #Art 
    
The teaser clip for the dubstep producer’s new single, “I Will Never Change,” is a clever riff on the prevalence of the digital waveform, recreated in a stop-motion accumulation of custom-cut vinyl—a logical extension of, say, art hacker Gene Kogan’s palm-sized extrusion of a Billy Joel track à la Makerbot, yet not as hacker-y as Ishac Bertran’s cut-and-paste records.
While waveforms have long been familiar to sound engineers and (with the advent of software tools such as ProTools, Garageband, etc.) amateur musicians alike, music streaming site Soundcloud might be credited with the ‘mainstream’ popularization of these graphic representations of audio recordings.

Re that last, uh, insight, my earlier piece on the waveform is here. This Tumblr collects waveform imagery here. 
(via Analog Strikes Back: Visualize Dubstep as Dubplates in Benga’s Stop-Motion Vid - Core77)

    The teaser clip for the dubstep producer’s new single, “I Will Never Change,” is a clever riff on the prevalence of the digital waveform, recreated in a stop-motion accumulation of custom-cut vinyl—a logical extension of, say, art hacker Gene Kogan’s palm-sized extrusion of a Billy Joel track à la Makerbot, yet not as hacker-y as Ishac Bertran’s cut-and-paste records.

    While waveforms have long been familiar to sound engineers and (with the advent of software tools such as ProTools, Garageband, etc.) amateur musicians alike, music streaming site Soundcloud might be credited with the ‘mainstream’ popularization of these graphic representations of audio recordings.

    Re that last, uh, insight, my earlier piece on the waveform is here. This Tumblr collects waveform imagery here

    (via Analog Strikes Back: Visualize Dubstep as Dubplates in Benga’s Stop-Motion Vid - Core77)

    — 2 years ago
    #Music Objects  #Waveforms 
    
Paper Note creates a tangible waveform from laser cut disks of paper. The user records a message, a sound or loads up music, and the system analyses the sound to map each moment to a corresponding slice. This project was made with Andrew Nip at CIID. We programmed it using Processing. Each Paper Note is made up of around 450 stacked disks of paper. The louder the volume at a specific moment, the bigger the disk. Our algorithm samples the right amount of information from the recording to scale the physical waveform to the size of around 14cm.

(via Voice Messages Become 3D Paper Waveform Sculptures: Paper Note)

    Paper Note creates a tangible waveform from laser cut disks of paper. The user records a message, a sound or loads up music, and the system analyses the sound to map each moment to a corresponding slice. This project was made with Andrew Nip at CIID. We programmed it using Processing. Each Paper Note is made up of around 450 stacked disks of paper. The louder the volume at a specific moment, the bigger the disk. Our algorithm samples the right amount of information from the recording to scale the physical waveform to the size of around 14cm.

    (via Voice Messages Become 3D Paper Waveform Sculptures: Paper Note)

    — 2 years ago
    #Waveforms 
    
In one of the more novel applications of the API for audio-storing service SoundCloud, one 3D printer is happily turning your music tracks and recordings into custom iPhone cases, each uniquely based on the waveform of your sounds.

From Sounds to Wave Patterns to iPhone Cases, a Design Made from Footsteps

    In one of the more novel applications of the API for audio-storing service SoundCloud, one 3D printer is happily turning your music tracks and recordings into custom iPhone cases, each uniquely based on the waveform of your sounds.

    From Sounds to Wave Patterns to iPhone Cases, a Design Made from Footsteps

    — 2 years ago with 1 note
    #Waveforms 
    Disquiet » The Waveform: The Shape of Sound →

    ¶ The Equalizer: The waveform’s strongest pop-cultural precedent goes back at least to the days of the high-fidelity home stereo system, specifically to the standalone graphic equalizer, which let you control aspects of your sound at a much more nuanced level than just dual treble and bass knobs, and which in some systems showed you what the music “looked like” in terms of where sound levels peaked at various points along the spectrum.

    Part of a very thoughtful post about the waveforms — and don’t miss the comments, where good points are made about the spectrogram.

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #Waveforms 
    
The project “Shape of a Song” by artist Martin Wattenberg and crew takes MIDI files and uses them to map out repetitive elements in songs in order to ‘see’ the patterns in the song.

(via Diagram of a song » Graphic Sociology)

    The project “Shape of a Song” by artist Martin Wattenberg and crew takes MIDI files and uses them to map out repetitive elements in songs in order to ‘see’ the patterns in the song.

    (via Diagram of a song » Graphic Sociology)

    — 2 years ago with 4 notes
    #Waveforms 
    
Please join artist Sari Carel and media scholar Jonathan Sterne for an evening of conversation addressing early experiments in sound reproduction and their link to contemporary sound culture. Moderated by Leah Abir, the evening will examine the relationship between sound and image, art and science, and imagination and technique through the mid-nineteenth-century device known as the phonoautograph. Invented by Edouard-Léon Scott de Martinville in 1857, the phonoautograph was a sound-visualizing machine that generated images of sound vibrations—images that resembled automatic drawings.

CABINET // Panel / “Revisiting Extinct Sounds,” with Sari Carel, Jonathan Sterne, and Leah Abir
Thx: Paul!

    Please join artist Sari Carel and media scholar Jonathan Sterne for an evening of conversation addressing early experiments in sound reproduction and their link to contemporary sound culture. Moderated by Leah Abir, the evening will examine the relationship between sound and image, art and science, and imagination and technique through the mid-nineteenth-century device known as the phonoautograph. Invented by Edouard-Léon Scott de Martinville in 1857, the phonoautograph was a sound-visualizing machine that generated images of sound vibrations—images that resembled automatic drawings.

    CABINET // Panel / “Revisiting Extinct Sounds,” with Sari Carel, Jonathan Sterne, and Leah Abir

    Thx: Paul!

    — 2 years ago with 13 notes
    #Waveforms  #History 
    kenyatta:

Rob Walker on the Iconography of the Waveform

What visual sign says “music”? Notes remain the most typical answer – particularly, it seems, beamed eighth or quarter notes (see the iTunes icon); the solitary eighth note with its jaunty flag; and the clef. The disc shape has had a pretty good run, and you still see instances involving headphones (Napster’s logo, for instance). Maybe representations of speakers and guitars would make the list, too. But if you want to suggest music in the digital era, how about the waveform?
As iconography, the waveform’s rise has been even more stealthy than the Google Maps pin: It’s not really associated with any specific service or product— although I may contradict that slightly below — but rather with digital sound in general. But as with other distinctly visual forms encountered mostly via bits, its progress can be gauaged by the fact that it has inspired some to de-digitize it into the physical world.

A great read. Click through for the rest.

    kenyatta:

    Rob Walker on the Iconography of the Waveform

    What visual sign says “music”? Notes remain the most typical answer – particularly, it seems, beamed eighth or quarter notes (see the iTunes icon); the solitary eighth note with its jaunty flag; and the clef. The disc shape has had a pretty good run, and you still see instances involving headphones (Napster’s logo, for instance). Maybe representations of speakers and guitars would make the list, too. But if you want to suggest music in the digital era, how about the waveform?

    As iconography, the waveform’s rise has been even more stealthy than the Google Maps pin: It’s not really associated with any specific service or product— although I may contradict that slightly below — but rather with digital sound in general. But as with other distinctly visual forms encountered mostly via bits, its progress can be gauaged by the fact that it has inspired some to de-digitize it into the physical world.

    A great read. Click through for the rest.

    — 2 years ago with 660 notes
    #Waveforms