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Most Obscure Hit Songs, Adjusted for Time
 1 Roy Ingraham Orch: Chant of the Jungle, 1930 2 Hilo Hawaiian Orch: When It’s Springtime in the Rockies, 1930 3 Horace Wright: My Own Iona, 1917 4 Marguerite Farrell: If I Knock the ‘L’ Out of Kelly (It Would Still be Kelly to Me), 1916 5 Olive Kline: Hello, Frisco!, 1915 6 Orpheus Quartet: Turn Back the Universe and Give Me Yester Day, 1916 7 Horace Heidt Orch: Ti-Pi-Tin, 1938 8 Clay Aiken: This Is The Night, 2003 9 Mina Hickman: Come Down, Ma Evening Star, 1903 10 Don Bestor Orch: Forty-Second Street, 1933

Details: The Songs That Time Forgot | Very Small Array

    Most Obscure Hit Songs, Adjusted for Time


    1 Roy Ingraham Orch: Chant of the Jungle, 1930
    2 Hilo Hawaiian Orch: When It’s Springtime in the Rockies, 1930
    3 Horace Wright: My Own Iona, 1917
    4 Marguerite Farrell: If I Knock the ‘L’ Out of Kelly (It Would Still be Kelly to Me), 1916
    5 Olive Kline: Hello, Frisco!, 1915
    6 Orpheus Quartet: Turn Back the Universe and Give Me Yester Day, 1916
    7 Horace Heidt Orch: Ti-Pi-Tin, 1938
    8 Clay Aiken: This Is The Night, 2003
    9 Mina Hickman: Come Down, Ma Evening Star, 1903
    10 Don Bestor Orch: Forty-Second Street, 1933

    Details: The Songs That Time Forgot | Very Small Array

    — 1 month ago
    #Popularity  #Charts  #Data 
    Pop music replaces hymns at two-thirds of funerals, survey finds →

    Pop music has replaced hymns at two-thirds of British funerals, a survey from Co-operative Funeralcare has found. Pop was the number one request at more than 30,000 funerals over the past 12 months, and only 4% of mourners requested classical music.

    My Way by Frank Sinatra remained the favourite for a record seventh year running, requested at 15% of funerals. It was last usurped in 2002, by Bette Midler’s Wind Beneath My Wings.

    Adele entered the funeral music charts at number 22 with Someone Like You.

    In 2005, hymns accounted for 41% of funeral music requests, but in the past 12 months the figure has fallen to 30%.

    — 1 year ago
    #Death  #Charts  #Popularity 
    How ‘Call Me Maybe’ and Social Media Are Upending Music - NYTimes.com →

    Only a year ago, the charts were dominated by stars who had come out of the old machine of radio and major-label promotion: Katy Perry, Rihanna, Adele, Maroon 5. This year’s biggest hits — “Call Me Maybe,” Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know” and Fun.’s “We Are Young” — started in left field and were helped along by YouTube and Twitter before coming to the mainstream media.

    Isn’t this the Arctic Monkeys/MySpace story with different proper nouns?

    Also: “Call Me Maybe” may not have come through traditional channels, but it sounds like something that did.

    — 2 years ago with 5 notes
    #Popularity  #Technology 
    Artificial Intelligence Gets Creative - WSJ.com →

    The people who guard the gates of big music labels guffawed at the prospect of a hit-picking algorithm, but [three year old company] Music Xray has now secured recording deals for more than 5,000 artists. The music industry can no longer ignore the algorithm.

    I’m surprised to read that 5,000 artists signed record deals in the last three years. I wonder what that means, exactly.

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #Composition  #Algorithms  #Popularity 
    Is Pop Music Evolving, or Is It Just Getting Louder? | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network →

    A group of researchers undertook a quantitative analysis of nearly half a million songs to look for widespread changes in music’s character over the years. The findings, published online July 26 in Scientific Reports, show that some trends do emerge over the decades—none of them necessarily good. (Scientific American and Scientific Reports are both parts of Nature Publishing Group.)

    — 2 years ago
    #Music  #Popularity  #Research 
    
Here, via Kevin Drum, is statistical evidence that modern pop music is boring or at least more homogeneous than in the past (yes, Tyler already linked to Kevin’s post but I wanted to link to the underlying dataset (see below)).We find three important trends in the evolution of musical discourse: the restriction of pitch sequences (with metrics showing less variety in pitch progressions), the homogenization of the timbral palette (with frequent timbres becoming more frequent), and growing average loudness levels.

 (via Is Modern Music Boring?)

    Here, via Kevin Drum, is statistical evidence that modern pop music is boring or at least more homogeneous than in the past (yes, Tyler already linked to Kevin’s post but I wanted to link to the underlying dataset (see below)).We find three important trends in the evolution of musical discourse: the restriction of pitch sequences (with metrics showing less variety in pitch progressions), the homogenization of the timbral palette (with frequent timbres becoming more frequent), and growing average loudness levels.

     (via Is Modern Music Boring?)

    — 2 years ago
    #Music  #Popularity 
    Edward Sharpe's 'Home' Succeeds Train's 'Hey Soul Sister' | MediaWorks - Advertising Age →

    'Home' by Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros Lands in Ads for the NFL, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Microsoft Kin and 'Cyrus'

    The piece assesses how much the musicians are really benefiting from the exposure, and is mildly interesting. 

    Side note: “Home” was my fourth-favorite song of 2009. And this is relevant to what I find interesting about advertising’s role in popularizing music. Referring to my favorite song of that year, the unbelievably great “Out At Sea” by Heartless Bastards, I smirkily wrote at the time: “It’s awesome, and perhaps if it ends up in a car commercial or whatever it’ll get the respect it deserves.”

    This could still happen: It doesn’t really matter if a song is a couple years old, it can still “break” belatedly. And the situation with “Home” proves that, even it’s not making the artists overnight millionaires.

    — 3 years ago with 3 notes
    #Popularity  #Advertising 
    Justin Bieber loses YouTube crown to Rebecca Black →

    Many critics have described her heavily auto-tuned track as the worst ever but it’s helped her YouTube channel reach 112 million views.

    — 3 years ago with 4 notes
    #ROFLculture  #Terribleness  #Popularity  #Charts 
    "In America the popular song is of comparatively recent introduction. Its prototype was a composition with monotonous refrain and elaborate setting, which could only be rendered by a trained voice after laborious practice. It was seldom heard outside of drawing rooms, where it was sung with due ceremony and technical precision by prim young maidens in fresh white gowns and dapper swains in swallowtails."
    — 3 years ago
    #Songwriting  #Popularity 
    Billboard Faces New Competition as Music Charts Evole - NYTimes.com →

    "BigChampagne, a media measurement firm in California, believes there is an opening for a new chart that better captures an artist’s popularity and commercial success. Last month, the company introduced a service, which it is calling the Ultimate Chart, that ranks artists based on the number of albums sold, singles sold, songs streamed online and other factors."

    — 3 years ago
    #Charts  #Popularity  #The Music Business