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    Musician Zoe Keating reveals iTunes, Spotify and YouTube payouts for 2013 | Technology | theguardian.com →

    Want to know how much a musician really makes from digital services like iTunes, Spotify and YouTube? Zoë Keating is one of the more reliable sources.

    The cellist, who self-releases her music rather than work with a label, has made a habit of sharing details of how her earnings break down between different sources, for the benefit of her peers and the wider debate around digital music payouts.

    Over the weekend, Keating published her latest set of figures as a public document on Google Drive, splitting her recorded-music earnings from 2013 into sales and streams. In short, 92% of her income last year came from sales – $75,341 – with a further $6,380 coming from streaming services.

    — 4 months ago with 3 notes
    #Business  #Money  #Indie 
    eurokriminal:

Venom’s rejection letter from EMI

    eurokriminal:

    Venom’s rejection letter from EMI

    (Source: bartgabriel)

    — 6 months ago with 1079 notes
    #Business  #Rejection 
    Christmas music: Dreaming of a hip-hop Christmas | The Economist →

    Mood Media [formerly Muzak] offers … 30 music channels at Christmas alone, tailored to such outlets as Christian bookstores, black barbershops and bilingual malls where Anglo and Hispanic customers mingle.

    Mood Media provides tunes (as well as smells from a 1,500-strong scent library) to over 300,000 American commercial locations. Family-friendly shops tend to shun raunchy Christmas lyrics such as Lady Gaga’s “Take off my stockings; we’re/ Out spreading Christmas cheer.” Mood Media offers “retail-appropriate”, non-explicit Christmas songs; that includes hip-hop tracks, such as “Toy Jackpot” by Blackalicious and “Christmas in Harlem” by Kanye West (“Won’t you come sit on my knee?/ And tell me everything that you want/’Cause, baby, I’m your Santa Claus”).

    The segmentation of Christmas partly reflects the science that now goes into selling to smartphone-toting consumers, who are at once better-informed and more distracted as they shop. Retailers use “dayparting” to target music to such different audiences as daytime mothers or after-school teens. Restaurants use high-tempo songs to make lunch-time clients eat fast, and slow tunes to persuade evening diners to linger (and run up bar bills longer than a six-year-old’s letter to Santa).

    — 7 months ago
    #Muzak  #Business 
    Behind the Remastering Boom - WSJ.com →

    Why would consumers—many of them baby boomers—pay upward of $100 or more for elaborate and expanded digital packages of music they probably already own? Their buying decision often comes down to a single seductive word—”remastered.” To repeat buyers of Johnny Cash, the Beatles, Miles Davis, the Beach Boys, Glenn Gould and many other iconic artists, “remastered” signals that the original music has undergone a restoration process to upgrade the sound.

    In truth, many consumers are unfamiliar with the process and unsure how to determine whether a new version is indeed an improvement. “Remastered isn’t a guarantee that you’ll be excited by the results—or even notice a difference,” said audio engineer Jay Kadis, a Stanford University lecturer and author of “The Science of Sound Recording” (Focal Press). “From the engineer’s perspective, remastering is a delicate balance between the original artist’s intent and what you can do with today’s technology. The best remasters are often subtle.”

    The word remastered—like “organic chicken” or “business class”—can mean many different things. Some record companies invest tens of thousands of dollars to painstakingly upgrade the sonic quality of an album using sophisticated equipment while other labels merely use inexpensive software to re-equalize the digital sound and then call it “remastered.”

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes
    #Listening  #Remastering  #Business 
    Zoe Keating, Cellist Who Exposed Her Musical Finances, Talks Music Making, Distribution [Interview] →

    Around mid-summer this year, Zoe Keating released a public Google Doc that reported her earnings from Spotify – which turned out to be around 3/10th of a cent per listen. (Nice summary article here in The Atlantic). This opened up a can of worms for the streaming content world, and was the first public shot in what has become an increasingly voluble debate about how much musicians earn from streaming services. Other bands followed suit with numbers. Pandora countered with numbers of its own. Cartoons on the subject were even made.

    To round out the picture, a month later, Keating released ALL the information she had about her music sales from the previous year (2011), causing further attention and stir. And making her a bit of a cause célèbre as an information hactvist in the muddled world of music, income, and the relationship between artists, labels, and digital services of all kinds.

    CDM was able to catch up with her at October’s SF Music Tech conference…

    Interview here.

    — 1 year ago
    #Business 
    
It began with an argument. Tristan Jehan and Brian Whitman met as Ph.D. candidates at MIT’s Media Lab. Both were amateur musicians passionate about the ways technology might recommend songs based on a listener’s tastes. Both were convinced that “collaborative filtering,” a trendy means of achieving that goal, was woefully inadequate. Their disagreement? Jehan’s research focused on teaching computers to capture the sonic elements of music, while Whitman’s studied the cultural and social components. In combining the two approaches they created the Echo Nest, one of the most important digital music companies few have heard about. 

The rest: The big music brain that knows what you like - Fortune Tech

    It began with an argument. Tristan Jehan and Brian Whitman met as Ph.D. candidates at MIT’s Media Lab. Both were amateur musicians passionate about the ways technology might recommend songs based on a listener’s tastes. Both were convinced that “collaborative filtering,” a trendy means of achieving that goal, was woefully inadequate. Their disagreement? Jehan’s research focused on teaching computers to capture the sonic elements of music, while Whitman’s studied the cultural and social components. In combining the two approaches they created the Echo Nest, one of the most important digital music companies few have heard about. 

    The rest: The big music brain that knows what you like - Fortune Tech

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes
    #Data  #Business 
    Grizzly Bear aren’t rich: New York magazine story reveals how even indie darlings can’t afford to live like rock stars. →

    Despite all this, Grizzly Bear are not living like rock stars. In fact, after riding a steady trajectory of success for more than half a decade, they’re living more or less the same way they were when they started. As Nitsuh Abebe notes in his excellent profile and cover story for the newest issue of New York magazine, many of them don’t have insurance. Band founder Ed Droste still lives with his husband in the same 450-square-foot Williamsburg apartment. Though they’re living comfortably for now, they haven’t earned any stability. Abebe identifies their joint musical venture as essentially “a risky small business,” and guitarist Daniel Rossen point out that when “your livelihood is in songwriting, you never know when that’s just gonna stop.”

    — 1 year ago
    #Business  #Indie Business 
    
The Cotton Exchange is a terrific vinyl record subscription service that delivers 8 LPs/year of rare, historic, or unreleased blues music right to your door. Recent releases have included Bukka White, Otha Turner, and Skip James! Exquisitely-curated by my dear pal and DIY musicologist David Katznelson with partner Barbara Bersche, who also collaborated on the Grammy-nominated “Alan Lomax In Haiti" box in 2010, every album includes detailed liner notes along with the 180-gram platter. For people like me who dig vinyl, the blues, or music history generally, The Cotton Exchange is a an immersive, educational, and inspirational experience disguised as a record club. It’s $100 including shipping for 8 records, a totally fair price in my opinion. The latest release comes straight from the Mississippi Hill Country: "Feelin’ Good" by Jessie Mae Hemphill (1923-2006). 

(via Cotton Exchange blues vinyl subscription service - Boing Boing)

    The Cotton Exchange is a terrific vinyl record subscription service that delivers 8 LPs/year of rare, historic, or unreleased blues music right to your door. Recent releases have included Bukka White, Otha Turner, and Skip James! Exquisitely-curated by my dear pal and DIY musicologist David Katznelson with partner Barbara Bersche, who also collaborated on the Grammy-nominated “Alan Lomax In Haiti" box in 2010, every album includes detailed liner notes along with the 180-gram platter. For people like me who dig vinyl, the blues, or music history generally, The Cotton Exchange is a an immersive, educational, and inspirational experience disguised as a record club. It’s $100 including shipping for 8 records, a totally fair price in my opinion. The latest release comes straight from the Mississippi Hill Country: "Feelin’ Good" by Jessie Mae Hemphill (1923-2006). 

    (via Cotton Exchange blues vinyl subscription service - Boing Boing)

    — 1 year ago with 3 notes
    #Vinyl  #Business 
    Reselling of Music Files Is Contested - NYTimes.com →

    A legitimate secondhand marketplace for digital music has never been tried successfully, in part because few people think of reselling anything that is not physical. But last month a new company, ReDigi, opened a system that it calls a legal and secure way for people to get rid of unwanted music files and buy others at a discount.

    — 2 years ago with 5 notes
    #Business  #Used Music 
    Hip Hop Invented Modern Music Economics →

    theatlantic:

    Derek Thompson:

    The Web turned songs and albums into commodities — easily downloaded, uploaded and distributed with the free click of a button. These days, to mint what they make, bands have to put their music to use — by hitting the road, by licensing to commercials, by excepting corporate underwriting, and by diversifying their appeal.

    Rappers have long understood that the real money in music isn’t from selling tunes, but from selling lifestyle. Dan Charnas’ new book on the business of hip-hop The Big Payback reminds us how Def Jam realized the potential of marketing music before Sony.

    Read the full article here.

    — 3 years ago with 47 notes
    #Hip Hop  #Business  #Lifestyle 
    Launching Andy Grammer With an Interactive Video →

    This “branching” video technology was developed by a small Israeli firm called Interlude. …

    After Mr. Greenberg demonstrated the Interlude concept to Old Navy, the company agreed to sponsor Mr. Grammer’s music video—a rare commitment for an untested artist—by putting up about two-thirds of the production budget and providing wardrobe. At the end of the video, viewers can download Old Navy coupons and free songs by Mr. Grammer.

    — 3 years ago
    #YouTube  #Murketing  #Business  #Promotion  #Sponsorship 
    The musician's life in a down economy | Marketplace From American Public Media →

    In the latest in The Art of Money series, Kai Ryssdal chats with Corin Tucker, formerly of Sleater-Kinney and now fronting her own namesake band, about the musician’s life in Portland — a city facing high unemployment rates.

    — 3 years ago
    #Indie  #Business